Display Blog Posts With Specified Tag
Thursday, December 5, 2019

Forcing Paperwhite Bulbs

Growing Bulbs Indoors For The Holidays

Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Bulbs

Usually, when we are getting ready for the winter season our minds are not thinking about blooming flowers or gardening.
However, it’s super easy to have beautiful blooming bulbs in your home for the holidays!

There are a variety of bulbs you can do this with such as, amaryllis, hyacinths, and then the flower we will show you today which is called a paperwhite Narcissus!
Paperwhite Narcissus
The best thing about paperwhites is that they have been prepared by the grower and do not require any chilling time. Most bulbs need time to chill before they can bloom.
For example, Hyacinths need up to 15 weeks of chilling time before they will be ready to be forced to bloom. If you are wanting bulbs for your home, make sure you ask for prepared bulbs. When they come into the warmth of your home, they will think Spring and begin to grow.
Paperwhite Narcissus

Forcing your paperwhites to bloom does not take much effort, and they will start to grow relatively quickly. It takes only 2-3 weeks before they are in full bloom, but watching the roots develop and grow in your DIY decoration will keep you interested!

You only need a few things to get started:

  • Paperwhite Bulbs 
  • Small pebbles/rocks 
  • A clear container (mason jars work great)
  • Decorations if you want to make it festive!
 

Step 1

Fill your clear jar or container with the pebble fairly close to the top, you may need to adjust depending on the size of your container.

Forcing Paper Whites

Step 2

Place your paperwhite bulbs in the glass jar. You want them to be close together so they can support one another as they grow Here’s a tip, when forcing paperwhites you will want at least two bulbs in one jar as it will look better when they’re done blooming. From a design point of view, odd numbers of bulbs always work too!

Forcing Paper Whites

Step 3

This is where you get to be creative! you can use so many different things to make this look festive for the holidays. We used fresh pine and cedar along with the sparkly branches and golden balls to bring that holiday feel. The great thing is there is no right way to personalize and it is a great activity for the family. Grab some old Christmas knick-knacks and let the creativity flow!

Step 4

Fill up your jar with water just so that the base of the bulb is sitting in it. In just a few days you will start to see the bulb spread its roots. Not long after that, you’ll have beautiful paperwhites for the holiday season!
Forcing Paper Whites


Wednesday, July 24, 2019
Posted By: Marian Vaughan in Recipes

In July and August, all the stone fruits begin to ripen - there is an abundance of plums, apricots & peaches.  Sometimes the sheer amount can be over whelming and, in any case, what cook doesn't want to take advantage of these fruits while they are at their best? Here is a recipe I have been making for so many years I had to look up where it came from!

This recipe comes from "California Culinary Cuisine" a collection of thin little books I bought when I was quite young; they were at the bottom of in a bin at a hardware store that is no longer in business. I remember buying them quite well, I could only afford one a week and would return to the store anxiously hoping they weren't all gone yet. I think they were about $5. I've been using them for about 35 years now. What an investment!


 

Spiced Stone Fruit Chutney  


1 Cup
1½ Cups
2 Lb
2½ Lb
1 Lb
2 Tsp
2 Tsp
1½ Tsp
½ Tsp
1
2

White Baslsamic Vinegar
Sugar
Peaches, Nectarines
Apricots, Plums or Pluots
Cherries (pitted and halved)
Whole Cloves
Cardamom Pods
Black Peppercorns (crushed)
Anise Seeds
Organic Orange (for zest)
Cinnamon Sticks
 


Let’s Get Started!

Blanch & peel the peaches, then pit & slice thickly all the large stone fruits, halve the cherries. Crush or grind the peppercorns. Strip off 4 strips of zest from the orange, each about 1 inch wide and 2 inches long


In a large nonreactive saucepan, stir together the vinegar and sugar.  Add all the fruit to the pan and stir to coat with the vinegar-sugar mixture. Place the cloves, cardamom pods, peppercorns and anise seeds on a square of cheesecloth. Tie the corners together with kitchen string and add to the pan along with the orange zest and cinnamon sticks. Let stand at room temperature for 1 hour.

Set the pan over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until the mixture is thickened and almost jamlike, about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Discard the cloth bag and cinnamon sticks.

This can be refrigerated and kept for a month at least.  I like to make it ahead for festive dinners.  Great with duck, turkey, ham or roast pork! I have also served it over icecream, or with cream as a dessert.  In my opinion, this refrigerated chutney preserves the fresh taste of the fruit best.



Alternatively, If You Like Canning: 
Have ready 7 hot, clean half-pint jars and their lids.  Ladle the hot chutney into the jars, leaving 1/4 inch of headspace. Remove any air bubbles and adjust the headspace, if necessary. Wipe the rims clean and seal tightly with the lids.

Process the jars in a boiling-water bath for 15 minutes. The sealed jars can be stored in a cool, dark place for up to 1 year. If a seal has failed, store the jar in the refrigerator for up to 2 months. Makes 7 half-pint jars.

Note: Non-reactive means does not react to citric acid.  Stainless steel is fine, enamel coated pans too, also glass.  No aluminum, no uncoated copper.

 
 

Thursday, June 20, 2019
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Shrubs

Hydrangeas are a very easy care shrub, especially for us here on the west coast, but good cultivation will bring out their best.

First of all, like most shrubs, they should be planted in fertile (organically rich), well drained soil, but with the additional caution that you must be able to water them easily! Hydrangeas need hydrating!! This is particularly true in sunny sites and in the first while after planting. Never forget that it takes a while for roots to get out into the surrounding soil, so as far as the new plant is concerned, it is still in a pot, and so should be watered thoroughly AT LEAST once a week.

After the plant is established, it will still need watering in times of drought, and will be one of the first plants in your garden to droop by way of letting you know things are getting dry.

Hydrangea Group

Macrophylla hydrangeas (mobcap/mophead & lacecap) produce their blooms from buds formed the summer before (old wood). Therefore, pruning in autumn or too early in spring can inhibit, even prevent, flowers. When the last frosts are over, the old flower heads should be cut back to the first pair of healthy buds below them. Any dead, or spindly branches should be removed at the base, and where there are untidy crossover branches choose the healthiest of these and remove the other. It should be noted that some of the newer cultivars have been bred to bloom on both old & new wood: but the advice of pruning for strength still applies.

Paniculata, on the other hand, blooms on new wood formed in the growing season and is also hardier than macrophylla. It can therefore be pruned in late winter to early spring as needed. An extremely vigorous plant, the shrub form is going to produce much larger flowers if restricted to 7 to 11 vigorous primary shoots. If grown as a standard, the plant will need rigorous pruning to keep it in good shape, but the same general guide of fewer, stronger shoots applies.

For both types, a good mulch in the spring and fall will help keep weeds down and preserve soil moisture. Feeding once a year with a slow release all purpose fertilizer will promote vigorous growth which will in turn provide for more abundant flowers.
Change Hydrangea Flower Colour

How to Change The Colour of Your Hydrangea

 

Most blue or pink Hydrangea macrophylla varieties can change their flower colour based on soil acidity and the presence of aluminum in the soil. If the soil is acidic (a pH of less than 7), the plant is able to absorb aluminum from the soil and turn the flowers more blue. Common soil acidifiers include sulfur, peat moss and various fertilizer products like Rhodo and Azalea fertilizers. The colour transformation happens slowly of the course of 1-2 seasons. If you want your flowers to be more pink, sweeten your soil, that is - make it less acidic - more alkaline, with lime, bonemeal and other similar products. A pH higher than 7 reduces the plants ability to absorb aluminum and turns the flowers more pink. Again this change happens over several seasons.


Friday, May 10, 2019
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Hanging Baskets

We have a huge variety and selection of Hanging Baskets at our Nursery and May is the perfect time of year to welcome these to your home. As you pick your perfect baskets for your home, remember that there are a couple of tips to keeping them looking great all season long.
Shelley with Hanging Basket

Size Matters!

First pick the biggest hanging baskets you can. Small baskets are more prone to drying out or running out of nutrients because they only have a small amount of soil. Bigger baskets look better! The basket should also match the scale of your home.
Begonia Basket for Shade

Right Plant – Right Place

Most baskets are designed for a specific amount of sunlight. Pick your baskets to match your environment. Baskets with lots of shade lovers like coleus or fuchsias need less sun. Other types of flowers like petunias will thrive in the full sun.

Watering

Moss baskets tend to dry out the fastest, wood and plastic baskets hold the water a little longer. When watering, avoid getting the foliage wet. Wet foliage can cause mold, disease and pest infestations. Instead, put your watering wand as close to the soil as possible. Water the basket thoroughly. You should see water coming out the bottom of the basket in a steady stream. You can check whether your basket needs water by giving it a little lift. A heavy basket indicates lots of water, while a light basket will need a drink. Most baskets will need to be watered at least once a day depending on the weather and temperature.
Hanging Basket Food

Feeding

Most baskets had fertilizer included in the soil when they started growing. By the time you purchase them, that fertilizer may already have been exhausted. Add a slow release Hanging Basket Food like our GardenPro 14-14-14 to your baskets as a long term food supply. This should give you blooms all season long, probably up to the first frosts. However, most annuals will stop blooming when they run out of food. The second thing you should do is to use a water soluble All Purpose 20-20-20 fertilizer and mix it into your watering can. Apply this on every third watering. You won’t believe the difference it makes!

Group of Hanging Baskets

Maintenance

Many annuals in your basket will look better if you ‘deadhead’. That is, removing the spent flowers. Some of these plants will also tend to stretch of get ‘leggy’. They can benefit from being cut back and then allowing them to rejuvenate and regrow. You may also find it beneficial to occasionally spin or re-orient your baskets so that all sides get the same amount of sunlight.

Hope these hanging basket tips help you enjoy your purchase even more! If you have any questions about your hanging baskets, please call or visit Arts Nursery and we would be happy to help!
For more information, check out our Manager Shelley's own blog for more tips on reviving hanging baskets during the hot summer months.
https://www.sowanddipity.com/revive-hanging-baskets/
 


Wednesday, March 29, 2017
Posted By: Rebecca van der Zalm in Small Fruits and Berries

If you ask people what their favourite summertime berry is… odds are they will say Strawberry. These delightful tasty berries are easy to grow and are small enough that they can be grown in pots, gardens or even hanging baskets. In this short article, we’ll introduce you to Strawberries and some of the many varieties available at Art’s Nursery.
Bowl of Strawberries

Strawberries belong to the Fragraria genus of plants and are one of the most popular fruits for fresh eating, cooking, jams, jellies and desserts. They grow to about 6 inches high and have semi-evergreen leaves comprised of three leaflets with serrated edges.

Types of Strawberries

There are three different groups of Strawberries:

  • June Bearing Strawberries
  • Ever Bearing Strawberries
  • Alpine/Wild Strawberries

June-Bearing Strawberries

June Bearing Strawberries are also called Spring Bearing varieties. They respond to increasing amount of daylight and shortening nights by producing flowers and setting a large heavy crop of berries in late spring to early summer depending on your location. June Bearing varieties tend to be much sweeter than other varieties. They may also produce a small crop in the fall when days begin to shorten and nights get longer. These types tend to send out more runners than do ever-bearing varieties.

Ever-Bearing Strawberries

Ever bearing Strawberries, also called “Day Neutral” varieties, produce a smaller, steady stream of berries in Summer through to the Fall. As long as temperatures are between 35-85F (basically above freezing and below 30C), they will continue to produce flowers and fruit. Ever bearing varieties tend to produce the most in the first year. Their disadvantage is that they don’t ripen as many fruits at one time and while they may be juicier, they may not be as sweet as June-Bearing types.

Alpine Strawberries (Fragraria vesca)

Alpine Strawberries, Fragraria vesca, is also called Fraise de Bois. These plants tend to produce much smaller berries, but are packed with incredible flavor. They are day-neutral and produce most heavily in late summer. Some varieties are available as seed or ornamental types may be sold as groundcovers. Alpine strawberries do not normally produce runners, but will self-seed. Generally speaking, Alpines are easier to grow and need less fertile soil and moisture than do other types of strawberries.
Alpine Strawberries

Growing Strawberries

Strawberries need a location with full sun, but most do not do well in hot, dry conditions. Excessive heat and dryness also encourages Spider Mites. Strawberries thrive in very rich, moist, but well drained soil. Elevated, well drained loam or sandy loam is preferable. Amend the soil with well rotted manure or compost for added benefit.

Air circulation is also important. Give plants more space between plantings and the better they will do. 12-24 inches between plants is ideal.

Fertilizing Strawberries

All Strawberries benefit from a healthy application of bonemeal at planting time. For June Bearing varieties, apply a balanced all purpose or fruit tree/berry food a few weeks after planting, but before flower and berries begin to form. For Ever-bearing types, fertilize more often up until mid-summer to encourage a steady stream of fruit. We’ve seen lots of good results from using Kelp as a foliar feed throughout the season.

Strawberry Care

Strawberries are short lived. They decline in production after 3-4 years. For a continuous crop, plant a few new ones every year and remove old ones from your garden. Most varieties will renew themselves on their own by sending out long thin “runners” that will root and create new strawberry plants for you. Just sever the stem once the new plants are rooted, and enjoy them in place, or dig and re-locate them.

June bearing varieties also benefit from pinching first year blooms to ensure a better crop in the second year.

As mentioned, strawberries need a fair amount of moisture, about an inch a week is common. However, avoid getting the leaves wet as this can lead to mold and disease. Mold is one of the most common problems facing strawberry growers. Good hygiene is the key to prevention. Provide good air circulation, avoid excess moisture on the leaves and remove any overripe or moldy fruits as soon as you can.

Winter Strawberry Care

In the Fall, tidy up the area and remove old leaves to prevent pests and disease. Discard excess or unwanted runners. Cover your strawberry plants with straw just before frost. This helps prevent injury from low temperatures. Remove the mulch in Spring as growth begins and the chances of frost have declined.

Common Strawberry Varieties

June Bearing Varieties

All Star

AllStar Strawberries produce a very large, light orange to red berry with sweet red flesh. It’s a large, vigorous plant that can produce many runners. Mid-Season. Fruit is extra juicy and can be as large as plums.

Cavendish

Cavendish strawberry delivers tremendous yields and many runners. Berries are very large and dark red in colour. Flavour is good. Originally from Nova Scotia. Long fruiting season.

Fort Laramie

This June and Fall producing strawberry is known for its periodic production through the growing season. Exceptionally aromatic berries are large, sweet and have an excellent flavor. Yields are heavy at times

Honeoye

This variety features dark green leaves and produces many runners. Very productive and vigorous, its berries are bright red, slightly tart and very large. Long picking season

Kent

Kent Strawberry is a mid-season, high yielding variety with large berries and excellent flavor. A vigorous grower that produces berries great for fresh eating

Quinault

Quinault Strawberry features medium sized berries with good flavor that are periodically produced throughout the growing season. Fruits can appear as early as 4-5 weeks after planting.

Totem

Totem Strawberry is a mid-season produces of a heavy crop of large berries with a good, rich flavor. One of the most popular varieties for the Pacific Northwest
Eversweet Strawberry Runners

Ever Bearing Strawberry Varieties

Albion

Albion is one of the best varieties for U-Pick fields. Fruits emerge from May through October and deliver a heavy yield of medium sized berries with excellent flavor

EverSweet

EverSweet strawberries are exceptionally sweet and flavourful. Yields are good and the berries very large. A good heat resistant plant.

Hecker

A lesser known variety amongst home gardeners that is better suited for cooler climates. Delivers a very heavy yield of medium sized berries with excellent flavor.

Seascape

Seascape is a medium sized strawberry that is both vigorous and high yielding. Berries are very large, bright red, firm and sweet. Harvest from early summer through fall. Peak fruiting occurs between August and Early September. Best flavor when grown with enough hear.

Tristar

Tristar is a reliable heavy cropper with medium sized, but sweet berries. Great for fresh eating. Harvest from summer through fall. Dislikes excessive summer heat, but can produce a large fall crop.

How To Buy Strawberry Plants

You buy strawberry plants in a number of ways. In early spring, strawberry runners, or small roots are available in packs of 1o or 25 depending on the variety. This is a good, inexpensive way to start growing strawberries. If you want some of the guesswork removed, you can purchase small starter plants, usually in 4 inch pots by April. Larger plants are usually available year-round in our small fruit section at Arts Nursery. Please call ahead if you are looking for a specific variety as the selection is always changing depending on availability and season.

Want to Know More?

Join April 1, 2017 for our Root To Fruit, How to Grow Edibles At Home event. This casual event happens from 11am-3:00pm with Q&A and sessions on seeding, growing herbs and veg, small fruits and berries as well as planting and caring for fruit trees. Hope to see you there!


Sponsored Advertisement

Be Part Of Our Growing Community!

Subscribe, Like or Follow Us Online

  Learn More >>

Blog Profile

arts nursery logo
Art's Nursery is a 10+ acre retail and wholesale garden centre located in Surrey, a suburb of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We've been in business at this same location since 1973 and we're proud to serve you today!

We carry an incredible selection of plants, shrubs, trees, annuals, perennials, vines, groundcovers, roses and much more. Soils, bulk materials, pottery and a variety of garden accents are also available.

Our plant selection is so large that you can actually drive a golf cart while you shop!

We pride ourselves on providing high quality plant, expert advice and an exceptional gardening experience.


Subscribe To Our Newsletter


Blog Search

Recent Posts

Thursday, December 5, 2019
Forcing Paperwhite Bulbs

Usually, when we are getting ready for the winter season our minds are not thinking about blooming f...

Tuesday, September 17, 2019
8 Easy Care House Plants You’ll Love

I know there are many of us out there who would love to take part in the house plant trend, growing ...

Sunday, September 15, 2019
9 Rare and Unusual Tropical Ferns

This fall (2019) we've managed to source a variety of unique, unusual and hard to find tropical fern...

Thursday, September 12, 2019
September in the Pollinator Garden

The days are unmistakably shortening. We are heading breakneck towards the equinox (Sept. 23), and a...

Thursday, September 12, 2019
Now is the Time to be Alert for Fall Bulbs

In the fall, we are cheered by the arrival of bulbs that promise spring again soon. I have not the s...

Saturday, August 24, 2019
Tree Queens of Summer

​​​Hungry for spring, we so often choose our trees: cherries, deciduous magnolias, dogwoods, stewart...

Saturday, August 24, 2019
Vegetarian Garlic Broth

Roses love it, vampires fear it. I have a cushion that advises: anyone who doesn't love cats must ha...

Saturday, August 24, 2019
Golden Beet Borscht

As the end of August approaches we strive to make the most of the warm days we have left in the gard...


Tag Cloud

forcing paper white bulbs indoor bulbs growing daffodils indoors paperwhite narcissus winter bulbs bulbs flower bulbs indoor flower bulbsIndoor plants house plants tropicals easy care low maintenance tollerant low light snake plant pothos philodendron cactus plantsferns tropical ferns tree ferns brazilian tree fern tasmanian tree fern blechnul golden zebra fern heart fern birds nest fern staghorn fern licorice fern fronds indoor ferns tender ferns rare ferns unusual fernspollinators gardening september fall equinox autumn bees butterflies hummingbird pacific northwest bc british columbia lower mainland surrey langley vancouver mountains fall bulbs planting shop local colchicum fox tail lily crocus waterlily crocusmagnolia grandiflora teddy bear magnolia flowers trees blooming summer albizia pink bloomsgarlic broth garlic broth recipes vegan vege vegetarian soup grow your own baking cooking potato brothtomatoes august garden potatoes dill dill stalks recipe borscht sour cream beets golden beetsMacrophylla hydrangeas shrubs deciduous new varieties shady spring flowering canada narcissus daffodils tulips tulipa hyacinth muscari grape hyacinth iris foxtail lily camas lilyfruit fool blog fruit peaches nectarines stone fruit family whipped cream sugar local produce localquince fig ficus fig tree chutney fresh fruit delicious food jam flavor diy garden summertime perennials relaxing nature deadhead hibiscus fruit trees pruning growing cherries apricots canning hummingbirds crocrosmia rudbeckia watering mophead hydrangeas lacecap hydrangeas hydrangea basics what is a hydrangea deciduous shrub hydrangea plants panicle hydrangea paniculatahow to grow hydrangeas learn to grow hydrangeas hydrangea care growing hydrangeasnew plants whats new arts nursery ruffles echeveria spinning gum tree eucalyptus hop organic compost fuyu persimmon itoh peony Joanna marlene itoh peony baptisiahanging baskets hanging basket tips hanging basket care growing hanging basketsroses select roses brad brad roses vogue anniversary vogue rose red rose pink rose apricot rose fragrance nursery garden centre

Blog Roll

Other interesting gardening blogs that we follow include:

Blog RSS Feed

Keep in touch by subscribing to our RSS/Atom News Feeds


Subscribe Via FeedBurner

 Subscribe in a reader

Art's Nursery Ltd.

8940 192nd Street,
Surrey, BC, Canada,
V4N 3W8

Tel: (604) 882-1201
Fax: (604) 882-5969
Email: info@artsnursery.com
Hours:Hours of Operation
Map:Map & Directions
Contact:Contact Us

Art's Nursery is dog friendly

Subscribe to Our E-Newsletter

Copyright (c) 2019 Art's Nursery Ltd.  | 8940 192nd Street, Surrey, BC, Canada, V4N 3W8  | tel: 604.882.1201  | SiteMap  | Privacy Statement |